Routine UK immunisation schedule

It’s all change for the UK immunisation schedule this year. If, like me, you’re feeling a little in the dark, then you may find this summary helpful.

Age

Diseases

Vaccine given

Site

Change

2m

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio & H.influenzae B

Pediacel: DTaP/IPV/Hib

Thigh

NEW!

Introduction of

rotavirus

Pneumococcal

Prevenar 13: PCV

Thigh

Rotavirus

Rotarix

ORAL

3m

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio & H.influenzae B

Pediacel: DTaP/IPV/Hib

Thigh

NEW!

Introduction of

rotavirus

Meningitis C

Menjugate or NeisVac-C: MenC

Thigh

Rotavirus

Rotarix

ORAL

4m

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio & H.influenzae B

Pediacel: DTaP/IPV/Hib

Thigh

STOPPPED!

4m Men C

stopped

Pneumococcal

Prevenar 13: PCV

Thigh

12-13m

H.influenzae B and Meningitis C

Menitorix: Hib/MenC

Thigh/ upper arm

Pneumococcal

Prevenar 13: PCV

Thigh/ upper arm

Measles mumps and rubella

Priorix or VaxPRO: MMR

Thigh/ upper arm

2 & 3 year olds

Influenza

Fluenz: Influenza

NASAL

NEW!

Annually

3y 4m

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio

Repevax: dTaP/IPV or Infanrix-IPV: DTaP/IPV

Upper arm

Measles mumps and rubella

Priorix or VaxPRO: MMR

Upper arm

Girls 12-13y

HPV 16 & 18 (common cervical cancer strains) and 6 & 11 (genital wart strains)

Gardasil: HPV (3 doses: 0m, 1–2m & 5m after 2nd dose)

Upper arm

14y (via schools)

Tetanus, diphtheria and polio

Revaxis: Td/IPV

Upper arm

NEW!

Booster dose of Men C

Meningitis C

Meningitec/Menjugate/NeisVac-C: Men C

Upper arm

65y

Pneumococcal disease

Pneumovax II: PPV pneumococcal polysaccharide

Upper arm

65y and over

Influenza

Annual flu jab

Upper arm

70y

Shingles

Zostavax

SUBCUT

Upper arm

NEW!

Introduction of shingles vaccine

What are the key changes and reasons for the change?

  • Rotavirus immunisation has been introduced at 2m and 3m age. Rotavirus is a common cause of severe infantile diarrhoeal illness and affects 140,000 children under 5 annually in the UK. Mortality is low here but morbidity can be significant with 10% (14,000) requiring hospitalisation. Vaccination should reduce hospitalisation rates by 70%.
  • The Meningitis C schedule has changed with a single vaccine being given in infancy (at 3m), the 12–13m dose continues, but a new meningitis C booster will be offered at 14y. UK-based studies have shown that a single immunisation in early childhood offers good protection for one year, so the 4m booster is being dropped. The booster at 12-13m offers good protection in early childhood but this usually wanes by teenage years, hence the introducing a booster dose then.
  • Influenza will be offered to all healthy children aged 2-17y, starting with 2y and 3y age group. This is to reduce disease burden in children and indirectly in at risk groups and young babies.
  • Shingles vaccination will be offered to those aged 70y (with a catch-up programme for 79y olds this year). In England and Wales 30,000 people get shingles each year. Around 0.1% affected over 70y die during an infection (although possibly of a co-morbidity rather than shingles itself). The vaccine is not offered to those aged 80 or over because its effectiveness declines with age.

The GP Update team run one-day courses, bringing GPs up to date with all the latest evidence and guidelines. For further information about GP Update visit www.gp-update.co.uk.

No Comments Yet.

Leave your comments