A la recherche du temps perdu

15th July 2010 by Judith Harvey

I have just been clearing out – old textbooks, cuttings from Update and BMJ from the days before information could be stored electronically, even some old lecture notes (did I once know all that?).

Since I don’t recall my days as a clinical student with fondness, I was surprised while leafing through dog-eared volumes to experience a degree of nostalgia, though not strongly enough to put many books back on the shelf. However, a few escaped the cull.

I couldn’t bring myself to throw away my first Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. The first edition came out just in time for my house-jobs, and it kept me sane and my patients safe. Well, safer. In those days the recto pages of Oxford handbooks were blank, for you to make your own notes. Invaluable for recording the sort of clinical gems which evidence-based medicine cannot reach. They were useful too for noting that consultant A wanted all patients admitted with diagnosis B to be put on drug C, whereas consultant D would tear you off a strip if he saw C on a patient’s drug chart.

Read for free

Sign up to access everything.

Free trial

Login

Already a member? Login to view this content.

Login

"I started using LocumDeck as one of our locums used it. It was easy to see her availability and when bookings are made I get confirmation of the booking and can view them on the calendar too. When invoices are sent, I can see it on the site, and digitally sign the pension form (this is one of the best bits!). It would be good if all locums used it, as then it would be so much easier for me to track my bookings and check their availability without emailing or texting them, waiting for a reply and then emailing back to confirm. It’s a great place for their documents to sit also. I can access it from home or my mobile which is useful as when I am not in surgery is when I usually need a locum!"

Debbie, Practice Manager in St Ives

See the full list of features within our NASGP membership plans

Membership